Furnivall Quarto Facsimiles

Innovations

Frederick J. Furnivall (1825-1910), an early adherent of the movement to experience Shakespeare in his most primal textual state, developed the 43-volume series Shakspere-Quarto Facsimiles, launched in the 1880s. It was meant to compete with the Halliwell-Ashbee facsimiles, which were not photographically reproduced but lithographic, with every letter in every text hand-traced.  This limited edition was blindingly impractical and costly. Furnivall enlisted the photolithographic printers William Griggs and Charles Praetorius and issued a much less expensive product, with critical introductions, line-numbers, and the like. His ethos was moral and nationalistic.  The more Shakespeare, the better off English-speaking citizens would be. 


Andrew Murphy's Shakespeare in Print (2003) provided some of the information above.  Furnivall's photograph is to the left. 


AIM25 page on Furnivall

1-5

1. Ham. Q1 1603   2. Ham. Q2  1604   3. MND Q1 1600 (Fisher copy)  


4. MND Q2 1600  (Roberts copy)    5. LLL Q1 1598

5-10

16-20

16. MV  Q2 1600 (I.R. for Thomas Hayes)  17. R2  Q1 1597 (Devonshire)  18.  R2 Q2 1597 (Huth)  19.  R2 Q3 1600 (BL)  20.  R2 Q5 1635

41-43

41.  Troublesome Raigne II (1591)   42. R3 Q3 1602   43.  R3 Q6 1634


to the left: Furnivall and his ladies' sculling team. He was a polymath: editor, spelling reformer, raconteur. Some think he was the model for Shaw's Henry Higgins in Pygmalion